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Eighth Douglas Johnson Memorial Lecture in French History.


The Society for the Study of French History

and

The Association for the Study of Modern and Contemporary France

and

Institut Français, Royaume-Uni

Present:

The Douglas Johnson Memorial Lecture,
Monday 8th January 2018.

How the French and British Learned to Vote

Professor Malcolm Crook (Keele University)

Venue:

La Médiathèque, Institut Français, 17 Queensberry Place, South Kensington, London SW7 2DT

Tickets:

https://www.institut-francais.org.uk/events-calendar/whats-on/talks/music-rendezvous-how-the-french-and-british-vote/

 

Professor Malcolm Crook's lecture will draw on original research into the history of voting in France, whose specific features are further illuminated by a comparison with that of Britain. The lecture will explore the relatively neglected subject of how people cast their votes rather than who was elected, by focusing on three important questions. First, turnout: just how many of those progressively enfranchised from the late eighteenth century onwards responded positively to the opportunity to make their choice of representatives at different levels of the electoral process, and why has non-voting recently become more pronounced? Second, secrecy: taken for granted today, why was the vote cast in public, even orally, for much of the nineteenth century when the vote was cast in public, and why was this openness stoutly defended in some quarters until the later advent of ballot papers, polling booths, envelopes and isoloirs? Thirdly, and finally, spoiling: in the second round of the presidential contest in France last June, why did no less than four million people submit a blank or annotated paper, knowing it would not count? This subversive practice, which seems to be catching on in Britain, has a long history on the far side of the Channel. In conclusion, like other aspects of voting culture, does it testify to an enduring vitality in the way the French people express their sovereignty?

 

 

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Previous Lectures:

The First Douglas Johnson Annual Lecture:
The Society for the Study of French History and The Institute of Historical Research, London present:
Julian Jackson (Queen Mary University of London), 'The Century of Charles de Gaulle' (November 2010).
[details and video/podcast of event]


The Second Douglas Johnson Annual Lecture:
The Society for the Study of French History and The Institute of Historical Research, London present:
Professor Richard Thomson (Edinburgh University), 'New Wine in Old Bottles: Adapting and Abusing Tradition in French Visual Culture, 1880-1910' (January 2012).
[details and podcast of event]


The Third Douglas Johnson Annual Lecture:
The Society for the Study of French History and The Institute of Historical Research, London present:
Professor Ruth Harris, (New College, Oxford), 'Rolland, Gandhi and Madeleine Slade: Spiritual Politics, France and the Wider World' (January 2013).
[details and podcast of event]

The Fourth Douglas Johnson Annual Lecture:
The Society for the Study of French History, the Association for the Study of Modern and Contemporary France and The Institute of Historical Research, London present:
Professor Andrew Knapp, (University of Reading), 'Bombing and Memory: Britain and France, 1940-1945' (January 2014).
[details and podcast of event]

The Fifth Douglas Johnson Annual Lecture:
The Society for the Study of French History, the Association for the Study of Modern and Contemporary France and The Institute of Historical Research, London present:
Professor John Horne, (Trinity College Dublin), 'Myth or Model? The French Revolution in the Great War' (January 2015).
[details and podcast of event]

The Sixth Douglas Johnson Annual Lecture:
The Society for the Study of French History and the Association for the Study of Modern and Contemporary France present:
Professor Siân Reynolds, (University of Stirling), 'Children of the Revolutionaries' (January 2016).
[details of event]

The Seventh Douglas Johnson Annual Lecture:
The Society for the Study of French History and the Association for the Study of Modern and Contemporary France present:
Professor Colin Jones (Queen Mary), 'Rethinking Robespierre and the French Revolutionary Terror' (January 2017).
[details of event]

 

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